Fever | Revista independiente de música

Indie music magazine in:

More poplacara:

Fever

Why did rock and roll become universal?

The hegemonic situation of the United States after the Second World War helped it spread its lifestyle to all the countries in its area of ​​influence, being welcomed by its allies with great pleasure.

Rock and roll, despite its unconventional spirit, was also an exportable product that was enthusiastically received in every corner. In addition, it proved to be easily adapted to other languages.

Gino Paoli - Sapore Di Sale (1963)

A song composed by himself and one of the first hits of Italian pop. It is made up fifty percent by traditional music and fifty percent by the new pop that came from America.

gp_tema1_0.jpg

Gino Paoli was born in Monfalcone and he is one of the greatest representatives of Italian light music. He was one of the many young artists who participated in the San Remo festival. His beginnings place him on the Ricordi label accompanied by his friend Luigi Tenco. At the beginning of the sixties, he created some of his best-known songs, and in 1963 he achieved international success with Sapore Di Sale. He is the author of the lyrics and the music of practically all the songs he performs.

How was it received?

Rock and roll was received with varying intensity depending on the destination, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France or Italy were the countries in which it hit harder and in which it became a generational fever.

In Europe, the United Kingdom and France remained similar to North American rock and roll, while the Mediterranean countries cultivated a more melodic style supported by the song festivals.

Takeshi Terauchi - Softly as in a Morning Sunrise (1967)

A song composed by himself in which Terauchi gives a whole instrumental surf rock lesson. It is one of many examples of the power that rock and roll had to penetrate other cultures.

tt_tema2_0.jpg

Takeshi Terauchi, known as Terry, is a Japanese instrumental rock guitarist. His guitar style is characterized by frenetic picking and intense use of the tremolo. After starting his career playing country with Jimmy Tokita and The Mountain Playboys, in 1962 he set up his first group, The Blue Jeans, which he abandoned in 1966 to form The Bunnys. In May 1967 he created his own record label, Teraon, with which he still remains active. He has appeared in films and has received several awards for his career.

Where did it have the most support?

Undoubtedly, the United Kingdom was the country where rock and roll was best received. In fact, it became part of its cultural heritage and a national scene developed that still continues to rival that of the United States.

Both countries shared the same language and had a similar level of development. In addition, in the 1950s, British youth learned about American culture through troops stationed in the country.

Vince Taylor and his Playboys - Brand New Cadillac (1959)

A song composed by Taylor himself, member of the first generation of young British people who were mesmerized by the rock and roll of American stars.

Vince Taylor was a British boy whose family emigrated to the United States. At 18 he began singing as an amateur, fascinated by the music of Gene Vincent and Elvis Presley. A fortunate trip to London brought him into contact with several musicians with whom he formed The Playboys band. In 1958, they recorded a bunch of good songs including Brand New Cadillac. He became a legend that inspired several generations of British musicians such as Van Morrison, David Bowie or The Clash.

¡share!